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2 Dec

sony a6600 video test

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In terms of high speed video recording, the A6600 can record Full HD video at up to 120 frames per second and also includes a "Slow & Quick Motion" mode. Further, its autofocus system is improved, with the A6600 offering 425 PDAF and 425 CDAF points compared to the A6500's 425 PDAF and only 169 CDAF points. The A6600 becomes the first A6000 model to sport a headphone jack and while it’s long overdue, I’m still pleased to see it here – along with the bigger battery, it’s another of the key upgrades over the A6400 and A6500. In terms of buffer depths, Sony rates the camera for 46 raw images at 11 fps and 116 JPEG images before the buffer fills, but we will verify these specs in our lab testing. The A6600 now includes a built-in intervalometer, but it drops Sony's in-camera Sweep Panorama support. When using it as a selfie display, there is a slight bit of the display which is obscured by the top plate of the camera, but it's a very small portion of the screen. Sony does exploit this spare area for shooting information, but the active image area for stills remains smaller than rivals with narrower screens. It’s paired with the latest BIONZ X processor. As I mentioned before, it may seem a little odd to be writing a review of the Sony a6000 in 2020, several years after its release. Although both cameras give you an output of 24MP (6000×4000), the sensor found inside their bodies is different. While it may look very similar to the A6400 and A6500, the new A6600 does add a fourth custom button to the camera body. Above: The A6600 of course supports face and eye detection for humans and animals, all updated to Sony’s latest Real Time Tracking versions and like other models with the same capability, it’s eerily good at finding and locking onto an eye quickly and from an impressive distance. Note the X-T3’s screen also tilts vertically, but additionally lets you angle it out a little to the side for easier framing in the portrait orientation at high or low angles. SONY a6600 has IBIS which makes pictures more sharp and perfectly in focus. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad, but just outclassed in resolution by a number of rivals, again including the Fujifilm X-T3 which sports a 3.69 Million dot panel that’s more typical on a flagship body in 2019. Fujifilm may now offer phase-detect AF across the entire frame, but Sony’s eye and overall tracking software remains the most confident in my view. To make the test fair, and focus solely on IBIS, he paired each with a similarly specced lens with no optical stabilisation. ... For my test vlogging video, I set the LCD in selfie position and used the a6600’s built-in microphone rather than attaching an auxiliary mike. The A6600 uses the APS-C format whereas the A7 III has a 35mm format sensor, which is about 2.3x larger. Burst speeds are unchanged from the A6300, which means a top mechanical speed of 11fps with autofocus or 8fps if you’d like live-ish feedback between frames. It’s no different from other recent Sonys, but it still works well. The A6600 also becomes the first APSC model in the range to sport a (long overdue) headphone jack, and it now additionally supports eye detection in movies. In terms of wireless connectivity, the camera includes Wi-Fi , NFC and Bluetooth. The A6600 can record at up to 100 Mbps bit rates in the XAVC S format. Above: in another disappointing move, the A6600 inherits the 2.36 Million dot OLED viewfinder introduced back on the A6300 three and a half years ago. At this point it's reasonable to wonder how much of the A6600 is really new, as many features are shared between the A6400, A6500 and A6600 cameras. In terms of controls, I’d really like to have seen an AF joystick, while eagle-eyed Sony observers will also notice the A6600 now lacks a popup flash – in fact it’s the first A6000 model not to have one, with Sony’s justification being that target customers will either be video shooters or high-end photographers who typically don’t use popup flashes, but I still find them handy for quick fills and I miss it here – what do you think? The camera is 4.72 inches (120 millimeters) wide, 2.63 in. In terms of additional shooting features, the A6600 retains its predecessors' same 1/160s maximum flash sync. In addition to the body-only option, Sony sells the a6600 in a kit along with the E 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS for $1,799.99, about $200 less than … The A7 camera has an ISO range of 100 to 51200, with extended values going up to … The Fuji model has slightly more resolution: 26.1MP versus 24.2MP on the Sony. Having gone hands-on with the A6600 in New York, the front grip does feel better and more comfortable. The A6600 includes quite a few video features for its class, including 4K/30p video recording plus support for HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) video. The intro video was great, and I hope to view and learn from the others. The new Sony A6600 will go on sale in November and will be sold both body-only and as a kit with the Sony E 18-135mm lens. I’m really looking forward to your lens guide. Sony's a6600 doesn't exactly introduce any brand new technology, but its combination of winning features like a higher-capacity battery and seamless tracking autofocus means it's shaping up to be a very compelling camera.

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